You Say What?

Enter your e-mail address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

By Rebecca Teti


Tuesday: Open Forum

(Join each day’s Coffee Talk discussion: Mon: Parenting; Tues: Open Forum; Wed: NFP; Thu: Marriage; Fri: Education; Sat/Sun: Changing Roles)

This is the Open Forum Coffee Talk. That means ... anything goes. Ask a question, make a suggestion, share a story, offer some advice -- the floor is yours!

Rebecca Teti

Comments

  • What is the Catholic church doing in regards to encouraging more programs to help fight alcoholism and drug addictions in our communities? ? Here in Dallas we have such programs but thanks to a few volunteers that have pushed the issue on a church by church campaign. Unfortunately many priests feel it's not a urgent necessity. This program has already helped save many lives and helped keep many families together. God bless.

    Posted on Feb 19th, 2013 at 6:18 AM by Victor

  • I am wondering, Rebecca Teti, if you are available in some way to chat over email in regards to St. Jerome's switch to Classical. A few of us in Archbalt are feeling moved by the Holy Spirit to perhaps approach the Archbishop or Superintendent of schools about the possibility of doing something similar in a school or two around here. You came to mind immediately. Or would you recommend contacting St. Jerome's? Just to learn suggestions on how to approach it all, any difficulties we might be better off knowing ahead, etc. Can I put my email on here? I will if that is ok. Sorry for the public shout out, not sure quite how to connect. And only if you are able! Thanks so much and God bless, Josie

    Posted on Feb 19th, 2013 at 12:12 PM by Josie

  • St. Jerome Academy has been in touch with a number of schools and communities interested in implementing the St. Jerome Educational Plan, the first comprehensive Classical curriculum for Catholic schools. A few have already done so. You can contact Mary Pat Donoghue, Principal, at mdonoghue@stjeromes.org, or me, Christopher Currie, Director of Institutional Advancement, at ccurrie@stjeromes.org. God bless your efforts!

    Posted on Feb 20th, 2013 at 4:20 PM by Chris

  • Josie, I see my friend Chris Currie jumped in already -- I'm happy to talk to you if you like (I guess you recall I served on the curriculum committee that helped make the switch), but Chris and Ms. Donoghue are probably better resources! You can let me know off-line if you'd like to talk. Contact me at my name at verizon dot net.

    Posted on Feb 20th, 2013 at 4:45 PM by Rebecca Teti

  • Having a Masters in Ed., I do know a Classical Education can be good. It is one philosophy of education. I live in the SE but my concern is that kids will not know science and math which will help them get jobs. But over all, it is good. I had that with a bit of Montessori thrown in by my father who had that by Granny who met Italians in upstate NY in Hancock county. Good luck up there. BTW, that parish looks small compared to ours here in the SE. http://www.ctk-tampa.org/ is mine. The former pastor is now the rector of the Florida statewide seminary. No matter what curriculum you have, I hope you are teaching how to have a relationship with God and not just how to kneel correctly. That is the key to these kids having a conversion experience and the key to them wanting to go to church without having a stomachache. It is also about what they do for others in their service hours. I have a praise report or thank you God report. A group of Girl Scouts here in my parish are collecting diapers for our local Florida Healthy Start program, which is a pregnancy support program run by our government and helped by all the churches in the area. We are very pro life here and the late Florida Governor Chiles and his wife Rea started this. Most churches here support this. ;) Don't believe what you hear or think you hear. Many ladies have their kids. How we support them is another ordeal. Not all Girl Scouts are bad. The entire parish is getting involved.

    Posted on Feb 20th, 2013 at 5:31 PM by unknown

  • Why would a classical education preclude a strong basis in science and mathematics? The Ancients thought very highly of both disciplines and I have seen these subjects taught rigorously at classical schools I have observed.

    Posted on Feb 21st, 2013 at 5:29 AM by Becky Le

  • My understanding is that sometimes it is not the "same" science and math we value today. For example, the ancients valued astronomy, geometry, and physics. Great, but our kids need to have a firm grasp of other maths and sciences too. I imagine most schools disgress from purest classicism to incorporate these things, but it is worth checking. I went to a school that did NOT! My husband has a PhD in math and has been *horrified* at the holes in my math education. But he taught me a lot & honestly, as an adult I think I "get" it faster! :)

    Posted on Feb 21st, 2013 at 5:58 AM by Jen

  • Thanks so much for responding, ladies! When I can hop on the real computer I will be in touch! God bless! Josie

    Posted on Feb 21st, 2013 at 3:04 PM by Josie

  • I know there is an Our Lady of Hope Community that helps addicts but I don't think there is anything in our parish. Catholic Charities probably has programs that help.

    Posted on Feb 21st, 2013 at 6:27 PM by Re: Victor